Research

our systematic investigation and study of camp health and safety

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Scratching Our Heads: Survey of Current Head Lice Detection and Management Practices in United States and Canadian Summer Camps

Summer camps, attended by over 11 million children yearly, represent an ideal setting for head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) infestation from close quarters and opportunities for direct camper-to-camper contact. Lice infestations in summer camps, although non-life threatening, have substantial social, economic, and medical consequences for campers who are unnecessarily excluded and can cause more significant logistical problems for camp programs and parents compared to infections in school environments. Although the American Camp Association (ACA) and Association of Camp Nurses (ACN) recommend lice screening procedures and policies, current national camp practices for lice detection, management, and training are not well characterized.

Authors: Ashley A. DeHudy, M.D., M.P.H.1, Andrew N. Hashikawa, M.D.1, Michael J. Ambrose, M.D.2

1University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI; 2St. Joseph Mercy Health System, Ann Arbor, MI

Abstract

Poster

Assessing Disaster Preparedness Among Select Children’s Summer Camps in the United States

Man-made and natural disasters are increasingly common. Summer camps are at particular risk for multiple pediatric casualties when a disaster occurs. Degree of disaster preparedness among summer camp settings is unknown. We assessed disaster preparedness and use of local resources by selected summer camps nationally for a range of man-made and natural disaster situations.

Authors: Alan M. Sielaff, M.D.1, Megan T. Chang, M.D.2, Stuart A. Bradin, M.D.1,2, Michael J. Ambrose, M.D.3, Andrew N. Hashikawa, M.D.1,2

1Children’s Emergency Services, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 3St. Joseph Mercy Health System, Ann Arbor, MI

Abstract

Poster

Assessing Disaster Preparedness Among Children’s Summer Camps in Michigan

Nationally 11 million children attend summer camps yearly. Disaster planning is especially necessary in summer camp settings because children are particularly vulnerable to multiple casualties in the event a disaster occurs. Children are physiologically more susceptible than adults to adverse effects of chemical or biological exposures. They are also limited developmentally in their ability to escape or protect themselves. As a result, camps may be primary targets in shootings or terrorist attacks because of their dense number of children in a small area combined with their inability to escape from harm. Pediatric specific vulnerabilities are increasingly apparent through recent events such as Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Sandy, and the school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary. Media publicity has led to a growing national awareness of the importance of pediatric disaster preparedness and its current shortcomings. According to a national 2014 report, Michigan was one of two states nationally with the worst ranking for disaster preparedness among schools and child care centers. Because primary and secondary school disaster preparedness has been the focus of the majority of prior studies, the degree of disaster preparedness and training needs among Michigan’s summer camp settings is completely unknown. Major barriers to camp disaster preparedness research in Michigan have been the lack of access to summer camp leadership and unavailability of a uniform electronic record and database system among summer camps.

Authors: Megan T. Chang, M.D.1, Alan M. Sielaff, M.D.2, Stuart A. Bradin, M.D.1,2, Michael J. Ambrose, M.D.3, Andrew N. Hashikawa, M.D.1,2

1Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 2Children’s Emergency Services, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 3St. Joseph Mercy Health System, Ann Arbor, MI

Abstract

Poster

Food Allergies in Summer Camps: 2012-2013

The American Camp Association (ACA) estimates 11 million children attend summer camps yearly. Food allergic children make up about 8% of the pediatric population with nearly 40% of those children having a history of severe reaction requiring immediate intervention. The ACA and the Association of Camp Nurses (ACN) recommend clearly documenting severe food allergies and actions plans because campers are at greater risk for exposure to foods not being in their usual environment. However, the extent of food allergies among children attending summer camp nationally is unclear.

Authors: Natalie R. Schellpfeffer, M.D.1, Andrew N. Hashikawa, M.D.1, Michael J. Ambrose, M.D.2, Harvey L. Leo, M.D.2,3

1Children’s Emergency Services, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 2St. Joseph Mercy Health System, Ann Arbor, MI; 3Center for Managing Chronic Disease, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI

Abstract

Poster

Children with Severe Food Allergies in 2014 Summer Camps

Pediatric campers with food allergies are at greater risk for exposure anaphylaxis by not being in their usual environment. Children who carry a diagnosis of asthma are particularly at risk for severe anaphylactic shock in comparison to non-asthmatic children. Epidemiological investigations of food allergic children at high-risk for severe reactions in camp settings are lacking.

Authors: Natalie R. Schellpfeffer, M.D.1, Andrew N. Hashikawa, M.D.1, Michael J. Ambrose, M.D.2, Harvey L. Leo, M.D.2,3

1Children’s Emergency Services, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 2St. Joseph Mercy Health System, Ann Arbor, MI; 3Center for Managing Chronic Disease, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI

Abstract

Poster

Lice in Summer Camps: 2012-2014

According to the American Camp Association (ACA), summer camps were attended by approximately 11 million children from preschool age to adolescence in 2011 in the United States, with an estimated adult workforce of 1 million. Summer camps represent an ideal setting for head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) infestation due to close quarters and multiple opportunities for direct camper-to-camper contact. Lice infestations, although non-life threatening, have substantial social, economic, and medical consequences for campers. Lice can also cause significant logistical problems for camp programs and parents, and the cost of treatment can be substantial as the risk of further resistance to standard treatments becomes more commonplace. Although the ACA and the Association of Camp Nurses (ACN) recommend lice screening procedures and policies, the extent of head lice infection at pediatric summer camps is unclear.

Authors: Ashley A. DeHudy, M.D., M.P.H.1, Andrew N. Hashikawa, M.D.1, Michael J. Ambrose, M.D.2

1Children’s Emergency Services, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 2St. Joseph Mercy Health System, Ann Arbor, MI

Abstract

Poster